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Electric blanket

Belongs to:
Heating systems
Synonyms:
Heating blanket, Heating mat, Warming mat
Description:

An electric blanket is an electric heating device in order to locally generate heat near the human body. It can also be used to warm a mattress before sleep. The heating wires are sewn in into the blanket.
A heating mat is similar in function to an electric blanket, but suits, because of the pad-like design, to keeping a spot warm, for example like a waste water tank in a camper.

Frequency ranges:
  • 50–60 Hz
Type of field:
electric and magnetic

Measurements (acc. to literature)

Measurand Value Feature Remarks
electric field strength 250 V/m (mean, measured) - on top of the blanket [1]
electric field strength 475 V/m (maximum) - at the surface of the pad at 50 Hz [2]
electric field strength 570 V/m (maximum, calculated) - at the surface of the pad at 50 Hz [2]
electric field strength 1.5–3.5 kV/m (maximum) - at a distance of 1 cm [3]
electric field strength 2,000 V/m (measured) - in the vicinity of the device [4]
electric field strength ≤ 7 kV/m (measured) - on top of the blanket [1]
magnetic flux density 0.2 µT (maximum) - calculated average value [5]
magnetic flux density 0.25 µT (maximum) - calculated average value [5]
magnetic flux density 0.5–1.2 µT (maximum) - typical values at 60 Hz [6]
magnetic flux density 0.97–9.09 µT (measured) - out of 1283 sample points; frequency range: 40 - 800 Hz [7]
magnetic flux density 2.2 µT (maximum) - average level [8]
magnetic flux density 4.78 µT (mean, measured) - out of 1283 measurement points; frequency range: 40 - 800 Hz [7]
magnetic flux density 30 µT (maximum) - maximum value at a distance of 3 cm [9]
magnetic flux density 33 µT (measured) - in the vicinity of the device [4]

References

  1. Moser M et al. (2006): [Non-ionizing radiation and health protection in Switzerland: basic information].
  2. Leitgeb N et al. (2008): Electric emissions from electrical appliances.
  3. Hoffmann M et al. (2020): [Electromagnetic fields in everydays life. Latest information on sources, applications and effects].
  4. Ahmadi H et al. (2010): Electromagnetic fields near transmission lines - problems and solutions.
  5. Delpizzo V (1990): A model to assess personal exposure to ELF magnetic fields from common household sources.
  6. Mader DL et al. (1992): Residential exposure to 60-Hz magnetic fields from appliances.
  7. Kim YS et al. (1997): Exposure of Workers to Extremely Low Frequency Magnetic Fields and Electric Appliances
  8. Danielyan AA et al. (1999): The static magnetic field effects on ouabain H3 binding by cancer tissue.
  9. IEH et al. (2012): [BMU study: Ecological effects of 380-kV-ground wires and HGÜ-ground wires. (Report of the working group Engineering / Economics) Volume 4.3]