Study type: Medical/biological study (experimental study)

Neuropsychological sequelae of digital mobile phone exposure in humans. med./bio.

Published in: Neuropsychologia 2006; 44 (10): 1843-1848

Aim of study (acc. to author)

To examine the cognitive effects of digital mobile phone emissions, using well-validated neuropsychological tests, in a large sample size of 120 subjects.

Endpoint

Exposure

Exposure Parameters
Exposure 1: 900 MHz
Modulation type: pulsed
Exposure duration: continuous for 60 min

Exposure 1

Main characteristics
Frequency 900 MHz
Type
Exposure duration continuous for 60 min
Modulation
Modulation type pulsed
Duty cycle 12.5 %
Repetition frequency 217 Hz
Exposure setup
Exposure source
Distance between exposed object and exposure source 1.5 cm
Setup The mobile phone was attached to a non-metallic helmet, so that it rested against the subject's left ear with the antenna 1.5 ± 0.5 cm from the head. To prevent subjects from detecting the testing condition by sound or heat, the speaker was removed and the mobile phone was covered with soundproofing material, and a 5 mm thick piece of foam was placed between the phone and the subject's head.
Sham exposure A sham exposure was conducted.
Additional info Each participant attended two testing sessions approx. one week apart with real or sham exposure balanced for order. A double-blind crossover design was employed. For real exposures, the mobile phone was set at full power by a laptop while for sham exposures, the phone was in standby mode.
Parameters
Measurand Value Type Method Mass Remarks
power 0.23 W mean measured - -

Exposed system:

Methods Endpoint/measurement parameters/methodology

Investigated system:
Investigated organ system:
Time of investigation:
  • before exposure
  • during exposure

Main outcome of study (acc. to author)

Simple and choice reaction times showed strong evidence of impairment indicating that the more basic functions were adversely affected by exposure. In contrast, performance on the Trail Making Test (to test visual motor tracking) improved, supporting the hypothesis that exposure to digital mobile phone improves the information processing speed held in working memory.

Study character:

Study funded by

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