Study type: Medical/biological study (experimental study)

Effects of microwaves and hyperthermia on capping of antigen-antibody complexes on the surface of normal mouse B lymphocytes. med./bio.

Published in: Bioelectromagnetics 1983; 4 (2): 115-122

Aim of study (acc. to author)

To study the combined in vitro effects of microwaves and hyperthermia on the ability of normal B lymphocytes to cap surface immunoglobulin (Ig).

Background/further details

Normal mouse B lymphocytes were tested following exposure to 2.45-GHz (continuous wave (CW)) at 37, 41, and 42.5°C.

Endpoint

Exposure

Exposure Parameters
Exposure 1: 2.45 GHz
Modulation type: CW
Exposure duration: 30 min
  • power density: 50 W/m² minimum (10 mW/cm², 25 mW/cm², 50 mW/cm² and 100 mW/cm²)
Exposure 2: 2.45 GHz
Modulation type: CW
Exposure duration: 10 min
  • power density: 50 W/m² minimum (10 mW/cm², 25 mW/cm², 50 mW/cm² and 100 mW/cm²)

Exposure 1

Main characteristics
Frequency 2.45 GHz
Exposure duration 30 min
Modulation
Modulation type CW
Exposure setup
Exposure source
Setup Test tubes containing spleen cells were placed vertically in a microwave-absorber-line chamber 45 cm below the aperture of antenna (15 x 20 cm)
Additional info Cells were heated at 37, 41 and 42.5°C
Parameters
Measurand Value Type Method Mass Remarks
power density 50 W/m² minimum - - 10 mW/cm², 25 mW/cm², 50 mW/cm² and 100 mW/cm²

Exposure 2

Main characteristics
Frequency 2.45 GHz
Exposure duration 10 min
Modulation
Modulation type CW
Exposure setup
Exposure source
Additional info Cells were heated at 38.5°C
Parameters
Measurand Value Type Method Mass Remarks
power density 50 W/m² minimum - - 10 mW/cm², 25 mW/cm², 50 mW/cm² and 100 mW/cm²

Exposed system:

Methods Endpoint/measurement parameters/methodology

Investigated system:
Time of investigation:
  • during exposure
  • after exposure

Main outcome of study (acc. to author)

The data show that for the nonirradiated controls, capping is reduced from 90% at 37°C, to 52% at 41°C, to less than 5% for cells that were pretreated at 42.5°C. There was no significant difference between the exposed cells and the control cells when both were maintained at the same temperature. In another experiment (field 2), there was no significant difference in the percentage of capping between control cells and cells that were exposed to microwave irradiation during capping, when the temperature in both preparations was kept at 38.5°C.
The data indicate that the mechanism responsible for inhibition of capping are thermal in origin. Further studies are needed to examine what cellular components are affected by heat, resulting in inhibition of capping, and what would be the physiological significance of such inhibition at temperatures often associated with fever and hyperthermia.

Study character:

Study funded by