Study type: Epidemiological study (observational study)

Occupational exposure to magnetic fields and breast cancer among Canadian men. epidem.

Published in: Cancer Med 2016; 5 (3): 586-596

Aim of study (acc. to author)

A case-control study was conducted in Canada to investigate the association between occupational exposure to magnetic fields and the risk for breast cancer in men.

Endpoint/type of risk estimation

Type of risk estimation: (odds ratio (OR))

Exposure

Assessment

Exposure groups

Group Description
Reference group 1 highest average exposure: none
Group 2 highest average exposure: 0.3 - < 0.6 µT
Group 3 highest average exposure: ≥ 0.6 µT
Reference group 4 cumulative magnetic field exposure: none
Group 5 cumulative magnetic field exposure: 0 - < 0.8 µT
Group 6 cumulative magnetic field exposure: ≥ 0.8 µT
Reference group 7 time since last exposure: never exposed
Group 8 time since last exposure: < 10 years
Group 9 time since last exposure: 10 - 19 years
Group 10 time since last exposure: 20 - 29 years
Group 11 time since last exposure: ≥ 30 years
Reference group 12 time since first exposure: never exposed
Group 13 time since first exposure: < 10 years
Group 14 time since first exposure: 10 - 19 years
Group 15 time since first exposure: 20 - 29 years
Group 16 time since first exposure: ≥ 30 years
Reference group 17 age at first exposure: < 20 years
Group 18 age at first exposure: 20 - 34 years
Group 19 age at first exposure: ≥ 35 years
Reference group 20 duration of exposure: never exposed
Group 21 duration of exposure: < 15 years
Group 22 duration of exposure: 15 - 29 years
Group 23 duration of exposure: ≥ 30 years

Population

Case group

Control group

Study size

Cases Controls
Evaluable 115 570
Statistical analysis method: (adjustment: )

Conclusion (acc. to author)

A non-statistically significant increased risk of breast cancer was observed in men who were exposed to occupational magnetic flux densities ≥ 0.6 µT (group 3: OR 1.80, CI 0.82-3.95) when compared to those with exposures < 0.3 µT. Those exposed to occupational magnetic fields for at least 30 years had a nearly threefold increase in risk of breast cancer (group 23: OR 2.77, CI 0.98-7.82) when compared to the reference group. Findings for the other time-related magnetic field variables were inconsistent.
The authors conclude that their analysis provides limited support for the hypothesis that occupational exposure to magnetic fields increases the risk breast cancer in men.

Study funded by

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