New search

Oven and hob pack

Belongs to:
Kitchenware and household appliances
Synonyms:
Cooker, Hob, Oven
Description:

An oven is an electrically driven device for baking, roasting or grilling food. Nowadays, ovens are integrated into household stoves and can be operated with different heating methods: For top and/or lower heat, ceiling and floor of the oven are heated by heating coils; the natural air flow then ensures the distribution of the heated air. When using the circulating air method, a ventilator spreads the heated air in such an efficient way that a lower temperature can be set and thereby energy saved. For the hot air mode, there is an additional ring heater around the ventilator. Ovens which can also be used for grilling have another uncovered heating coil at the ceiling.

The alternating electric and magnetic fields of a cooker and a single hob at the fundamental frequency of 50 Hz resp. 60 Hz are caused by the heating process of the cooking plate.

Unless otherwise stated, the operating frequency confirms with measured frequency, i.e. the measurement was performed at the operating frequency of the induction stoves.

Frequency ranges:
  • 50–60 Hz
Type of field:
electric and magnetic

Measurements (acc. to literature)

cooker
Measurand Value Feature Remarks
electric field strength 8 V/m (mean, measured) - at a distance of 3 cm [1]
magnetic flux density 0.01–0.04 µT (mean, measured) - at a distance of 1 m [2]
magnetic flux density 0.06 µT (mean, measured) - average value of 18 stoves at a distance of 1 m; measurement bandwidth: 40 - 800 Hz [3]
magnetic flux density 0.21 µT (mean, measured) - average value of 18 stoves at a distance of 50 cm; measurement bandwidth: 40 - 800 Hz [3]
magnetic flux density 0.31–10.42 µT (measured) - of 1742 measurement points; measurement bandwidth: 40 - 800 Hz [4]
magnetic flux density 1.44 µT (mean, measured) - of 1742 sample points; measurement bandwidth: 40 - 800 Hz [4]
magnetic flux density 2.27 µT - average value of 18 stoves at a distance of 5 cm; measurement bandwidth: 40 - 800 Hz [3]
stove
Measurand Value Feature Remarks
magnetic flux density 1–50 µT (mean, measured) - at a distance of 3 cm [2]
hob
Measurand Value Feature Remarks
magnetic flux density 0.01 µT (mean, measured) - average value of 5 hobs at a distance of 100 cm; measurement bandwidth: 40 - 800 Hz [3]
magnetic flux density 0.08 µT (mean, measured) - average value of 5 hobs at a distance of 50 cm; measurement bandwidth: 40 - 800 Hz [3]
magnetic flux density 2.25 µT (mean, measured) - average value of 5 hobs at a distance of 5 cm; measurement bandwidth: 40 - 800 Hz [3]
oven
Measurand Value Feature Remarks
magnetic flux density 0.005512 µT (mean, calculated) - spatial average at distances between 30 cm - 3.05 m [5]
magnetic flux density 0.1–0.5 µT (measured) - at a distance of 30.48 cm [6]
magnetic flux density 0.13 µT (mean, measured) - average value of 13 ovens at a distance of 100 cm; measurement bandwidth: 40 - 800 Hz [3]
magnetic flux density 0.25 µT (mean, measured) - average value of 14 different ovens at a distance of 50 cm; measurement bandwidth: 0 - 3000 Hz [7]
magnetic flux density 0.39 µT (mean, measured) - average value of 13 ovens at a distance of 50 cm; measurement bandwidth: 40 - 800 Hz [3]
magnetic flux density 0.4–2 µT (measured) - at a distance of 15.24 cm [6]
magnetic flux density 0.4 µT (mean, measured) - at a distance of 30.48 cm [6]
magnetic flux density 0.9 µT (mean, measured) - at a distance of 15.24 cm [6]
magnetic flux density 1.19 µT (mean, measured) - average value of 14 different ovens at a distance of 10 cm; measurement bandwidth: 0 - 3000 Hz [7]
magnetic flux density 1.79 µT (mean, measured) - average value of 13 ovens at a distance of 5 cm; measurement bandwidth: 40 - 800 Hz [3]
Measurand Value Feature Remarks
magnetic flux density 1 µT (mean, measured) - at a distance of 15 cm [8]

References

  1. (2018): [Radiation and radiation protection]
  2. IEH et al. (2012): [BMU study: Ecological effects of 380-kV-ground wires and HGÜ-ground wires. (Report of the working group Engineering / Economics) Volume 4.3]
  3. Preece AW et al. (1997): Magnetic fields from domestic appliances in the UK.
  4. Kim YS et al. (1997): Exposure of Workers to Extremely Low Frequency Magnetic Fields and Electric Appliances
  5. Mader DL et al. (1992): Residential exposure to 60-Hz magnetic fields from appliances.
  6. EPA (1992): EMF in your Environment- Magnetic Field Measurements of Everyday Electrical Devices.
  7. Ainsbury EA et al. (2005): An investigation into the vector ellipticity of extremely low frequency magnetic fields from appliances in UK homes.
  8. Lacy-Hulbert A et al. (1998): Biological responses to electromagnetic fields.