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Epidemiological study (observational study)

Depressive symptomatology in women and residential proximity to high-voltage transmission lines.

Published in: Am J Epidemiol 1994; 139 (1): 58-63

Aim of study (acc. to author)

The association between depressive symptomatology in women and residential proximity power lines was investigated.

Endpoint/type of risk estimation

Type of risk estimation:
  • prevalence

Exposure

Assessment

Exposure groups

Reference group 1 women living one block away from the power lines
Group 2 women living close to power lines

Population

  • Group:
    • women
  • Observation period: 1992
  • Study location: USA (Orange County, California)

Study size

Total 250
Evaluable 152
Statistical analysis method:
  • logistic regression
( adjustment:
  • age
  • education
  • ethnicity, income
)

Conclusion (acc. to author)

Magnetic field levels taken at the front doors of respondents with homes close to power lines averaged much higher than those taken at the front doors of respondents living one block away (group 2: 0.486 µT, CI 0.426-0.547; group 1: 0.068 µT, CI 0.062-0.075). Women living close to power lines were no more likely than those living one block away to report increased depressive symptoms (OR 0.94; CI 0.48-1.85).
The authors conclude that no discernible increase in depressive symptomatology was found in female residents adjacent to overhead transmission lines compared with residents one block away.

Study funded by

  • not stated/no funding

Comments on this article

  • McMahan S (1995): Authors' reply on Re: "Depressive symptomatology in women and residential proximity to high-voltage transmission lines".
  • Clarke K et al. (1995): Re: "Depressive symptomatology in women and residential proximity to high-voltage transmission lines".

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