Study type: Epidemiological study (observational study)

Cancer risks in the Druze Isifya Village: Reasons and RF/MW antennas. epidem.

Published in: Pathophysiology 2012; 19 (1): 21-28

Aim of study (acc. to author)

A population-based case-control study was conducted in Israel to investigate the association between past exposure to mobile phone base stations as well as broadcasting stations and cancer risks.

Further details

The first radio transmitters in the Isifya village were erected in the beginning of the 1970s. Mobile phone base stations were added in the 1990s. In 2000 (before the start of the study), all mobile phone base stations and radio transmitters in the village were destroyed by local residents who attributed different health symptoms to the electromagnetic field exposure.

Endpoint/type of risk estimation

Type of risk estimation: (odds ratio (OR))

Exposure

Assessment

Exposure groups

Group Description
Group 1 distance between residence and closest transmitter: 0 - 50 m
Group 2 distance between residence and closest transmitter: > 50 - 100 m
Group 3 distance between residence and closest transmitter: > 100 - 150 m
Group 4 distance between residence and closest transmitter: > 150 - 200 m
Group 5 distance between residence and closest transmitter: > 200 - 250 m
Group 6 distance between residence and closest transmitter: > 250 - 300 m
Group 7 distance between residence and closest transmitter: > 300 - 350 m
Group 8 distance between residence and closest transmitter: > 350 - 400 m

Population

Case group

Control group

Study size

Cases Controls
Participants 47 260
Statistical analysis method:

Conclusion (acc. to author)

No association between past exposure to mobile phone base stations as well as broadcasting stations and overall cancer risks was observed (n=47; OR 1.00; CI 0.99-1.02), only colorectal cancer showed a negligible elevated adjusted risk associated with electromagnetic field intensity (n=11; OR 1.03; CI 1.01-1.05). Past occupational exposures to chemicals (e.g., pesticides) as well as electronics were found to be strongly associated with increased cancer risks (all sites: OR 2.79; CI 1.14-6.82).
The authors concluded that the study did not confirm the suspicion of increased cancer risks associated with exposure to electromagnetic fields for most cancer types in this village. There was evidence for an increased risk of cancers which were associated with chemicals and electronics, where there may have been exposures to electromagnetic fields.

Limitations (acc. to author)

Misclassification of past exposures is possible due to the removal of the antennas.

Study funded by

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