Study type: Epidemiological study (observational study)

Association between mobile phone use and self-reported well-being in children: a questionnaire-based cross-sectional study in Chongqing, China. epidem.

Published in: BMJ Open 2015; 5 (5): e007302

Aim of study (acc. to author)

The association between mobile phone use and self-reported well-being in children was investigated in a cross-sectional study in China.

Endpoint/type of risk estimation

Type of risk estimation: (odds ratio (OR))

Exposure

Assessment

Exposure groups

Group Description
Reference group 1 mobile phone use: no
Group 2 mobile phone use: 1 year
Group 3 mobile phone use: > 1 year
Reference group 4 duration of calls, 1 year use: 0 - 10 min/day
Group 5 duration of calls, 1 year use: > 10 min/day
Group 6 duration of calls, > 1 year use: 0 - 10 min/day
Group 7 duration of calls, > 1 year use: > 10 min/day

Population

Study size

Type Value
Total 793
Participants 781
Evaluable 746
Statistical analysis method: ( adjustment: )

Conclusion (acc. to author)

A total of 544 (72.9 %) participants owned mobile phones. The average duration of mobile phone usage was 1.3±1.5 years. More than half (53.4 %) of the participants spent fewer than 10 min on calls daily.
The most frequently reported physical symptoms were sleeping problems (17.8 %), fatigue (13.9 %) and dizziness (12.7 %).
Fatigue was significantly associated with the years of mobile phone use (group 3: OR 1.85, CI 1.07-3.22) and the daily duration of mobile phone calls (group7: OR 2.98, CI 1.46-6.12). There was no significant association between headache, dizziness, feeling low as well as heart beating fast and mobile phone use in children.
The authors concluded that there was a significant association between mobile phone use and fatigue in children.

Study funded by

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