Study type: Epidemiological study (observational study)

Association of Exposure to Radio-Frequency Electromagnetic Field Radiation (RF-EMFR) Generated by Mobile Phone Base Stations with Glycated Hemoglobin (HbA1c) and Risk of Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus. epidem.

Published in: Int J Environ Res Public Health 2015; 12 (11): 14519-14528

Aim of study (acc. to author)

A cross-sectional study was conducted in Saudi-Arabia to evaluate the association between the exposure to radiofrequency electromagnetic fields generated by mobile phone base stations and glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c) and the risk of diabetes mellitus type 2.

Further details

Hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c) reflects the average glucose concentration over the previous period of about 8 weeks. Increased levels are regarded as an independent and reliable marker for diabetes mellitus. Levels of 5.6 - 6.4 % are in the pre-diabetic range, levels ≥ 6.5 % are markers for diagnosing diabetes.
Blood samples were taken from all participants to determine the HbA1c level.
Students had been exposed to radiofrequency electromagnetic fields generated by mobile phone base stations for a duration of 6 h daily, five days in a week at both schools.

Endpoint/type of risk estimation

Type of risk estimation: (odds ratio (OR))

Exposure

Assessment

Exposure groups

Group Description
Group 1 power flux density measured in school 1: 9.601 nW/cm2
Group 2 power flux density measured in school 2: 1.909 nW/cm2

Population

Study size

Type Value
Total 250
Eligible 159
Statistical analysis method:

Conclusion (acc. to author)

The mean HbA1c level was significantly higher for the students of school 1 (5.4 % ± 0.22) than for the students of school 2 (5.3 % ± 0.34). Moreover, 30 (31.3 %) students of school 1 had a higher risk of diabetes mellitus type 2 (HbA1c pre-diabetic ≥ 5.6 %) in comparison to the students of school 2 at which 17 (27%) students had a HbA1c ≥ 5.6 %.
The authors conclude that exposure to high radiofrequency electromagnetic fields generated by mobile phone base stations is associated with elevated levels of glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c) and the risk of diabetes mellitus type 2.

Study funded by

Comments on this article

Related articles