Study type: Medical/biological study (experimental study)

[Abnormalities and intra-uterine death following microwave therapy in early pregnancy. Animal experiments] med./bio.

Missbildungen und intrauerines Absterben nach Kurzwellenbehandlung in der Frühschwangerschaft. Tierexperimetelle Untersuchung.

Published in: Munch Med Wochenschr 1972; 114 (6): 228-230
Journal partially peer-reviewed/unclear

Aim of study (acc. to editor)

To study the effects of temperature elevation induced by a short-wave therapy device on early pregnancy of rats.

Background/further details

749 pregnant rats were exposed to a single short wave treatment in the first 16 days of the pregnancy inducing short lasting rectal temperatures of 42°C. Additional investigations were performed at 39 and 41°C and controls were performed at 38°C. On the 20th day of pregnancy 7800 foetuses were delivered by Caesarian section.

Endpoint

Exposure

Exposure Parameters
Exposure 1: 27.12 MHz
Exposure duration: continuous for approx. 10 min. (rectal temperatures of 42°C) at different days of early pregnancy
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Exposure 1

Main characteristics
Frequency 27.12 MHz
Type
Exposure duration continuous for approx. 10 min. (rectal temperatures of 42°C) at different days of early pregnancy
Exposure setup
Exposure source
Setup abdomen of pregnant rats were heated by short-wave therapy apparatus
Parameters

No parameters are specified for this exposure.

Exposed system:

Methods Endpoint/measurement parameters/methodology

Investigated system:
Time of investigation:
  • after exposure

Main outcome of study (acc. to author)

As a consequence of the hyperthermia treatment numerous malformations arose. The data revealed malformations of the central nervous system, the eys, the tail and extremities as well as cleft palates. The malformation type corresponded to the teratogenic phase at the time of the short wave treatment. Before implantation (i.e. during the first days of pregnancy), the short-wave therapy was lethal for the majority of the embryos.

Study character:

Study funded by

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