Study type: Medical/biological study (experimental study)

Effects of millimeter wave irradiation on ATP synthesis and calcium transport in mitochondria. med./bio.

Published in: Radiat Res 1982; 89 (2): 348-360

Aim of study (acc. to author)

To investigate changes in ATP-synthesis and calcium uptake and efflux in isolated rat liver mitochondria after irradiation with CW millimeter waves. In addition the respiratory ratio (cellular respiration) was evaluated.

Background/further details

The experiments were carried out at different temperatures (4°C, 25°C, and 30°C).

Endpoint

Exposure

Exposure Parameters
Exposure 1: 34.92 GHz
Modulation type: CW
Exposure duration: continuous 15 min
Exposure 2: 50–60 GHz
Modulation type: CW
Exposure duration: continuous 15 min

Exposure 1

Main characteristics
Frequency 34.92 GHz
Type
Waveform
Charakteristic
Polarization
Exposure duration continuous 15 min
Modulation
Modulation type CW
Exposure setup
Exposure source
Parameters
Measurand Value Type Method Mass Remarks
power density 500 mW/cm² minimum measured - -
power density 1 W/cm² maximum measured - -

Exposure 2

Main characteristics
Frequency 50–60 GHz
Type
Waveform
Charakteristic
Polarization
Exposure duration continuous 15 min
Modulation
Modulation type CW
Exposure setup
Exposure source
Distance between exposed object and exposure source 0.0025 m
Chamber water-jacketed chamber
Parameters
Measurand Value Type Method Mass Remarks
power density 50 W/m² - measured - -

Exposed system:

Methods Endpoint/measurement parameters/methodology

Investigated system:
Time of investigation:
  • after exposure

Main outcome of study (acc. to author)

Mitochondrial ATP-synthesis was unaffected by millimeter wave irradiation. Irradiation of mitochondria led to a decreased uptake of calcium. These effect was temperature depending and more distinct at higher temperatures. The mitochondrial respiratory control (cellular respiration) was significantly decreased depending on the increase of power density and temperature.

Study character:

Study funded by