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220 kV to 300 kV power transmission line

Belongs to:
Overhead power transmission line
Description:

220 kV - 300 kV power lines belong to the extremely high voltage level and are operated with three-phase alternating current.

220 kV overhead cables are primarily used in Germany, Austria and Switzerland. The specification of 220 kV describes the regular nominal voltage, i.e. the value during normal operation. For the sake of reducing transmission losses, this type of transmission line is often operated at higher voltages up to 240 kV. Abroad, e.g. in North America, 230 kV is often specified as the nominal voltage.

Frequency ranges:
  • 50–60 Hz
Type of field:
electric and magnetic

Measurements (acc. to literature)

220 kV
Measurand Value Feature Remarks
electric field strength 10.8 V/m (maximum, measured) USA at a distance of 100 m and a current load of 600 A [1]
electric field strength 0.03–0.1 kV/m (measured) Germany root mean square at a distance of 100 m and a height of 1 m above ground [2]
electric field strength 0.1–0.2 kV/m (measured) Germany at a distance of 50 m and a height of 1 m above ground [2]
electric field strength 100 V/m (maximum, measured) Germany at a distance of 100 m and a height of 1 m [2]
electric field strength 0.133 kV/m (maximum, measured) Germany at a distance of 50 m and a height of 1 m [2]
electric field strength 200 V/m (maximum, measured) Germany at a distance of 50 m and a height of 1 m [2]
electric field strength 574 V/m (maximum, measured) USA at a distance of 20 m and a current load of 600 A [1]
electric field strength 1,070 V/m (maximum, measured) USA at a distance of 10 m and a current load of 600 A [1]
electric field strength 1.283 kV/m (mean, measured) Germany at a distance of 20 m and a height of 1 m [2]
electric field strength 1.458 kV/m (mean, measured) Germany under the lines at a height of 1 m [2]
electric field strength 1.5–3.5 kV/m (measured) Germany beneath the power lines at a height of 1 m above ground [2]
electric field strength 2.527 kV/m (maximum, measured) Germany at a distance of 20 m and a height of 1 m above ground [2]
electric field strength 2.594 kV/m (maximum, measured) Germany beneath the power lines at a height of 1 m above ground [2]
electric field strength 4.8 kV/m (maximum, measured) Germany at a height of 1 m above ground [2]
magnetic flux density 0.02 µT (maximum, measured) Sweden at a distance of 500 m [3]
magnetic flux density 0.036 µT (maximum, measured) USA at a distance of 100 m and a current load of 600 A [1]
magnetic flux density 0.06 µT (maximum, measured) USA at a distance of 200 m [3]
magnetic flux density 0.07–0.1 µT (measured) Germany at a distance of 100 m and a height of 1 m [2]
magnetic flux density 0.083 µT (mean, measured) Germany at a distance of 50 m and a height of 1 m [2]
magnetic flux density 0.1 µT (maximum, measured) Germany at a distance of 100 m and a height of 1 m [2]
magnetic flux density 0.117 µT (maximum, measured) Germany at a distance of 50 m and a height of 1 m above ground [2]
magnetic flux density 0.24–0.5 µT (measured) Germany at a distance of 50 m to the center of the power lines [2]
magnetic flux density 0.76 µT (mean, measured) Germany at a distance of 20 m and a height of 1 m [2]
magnetic flux density 1 µT (measured) Germany at a distance of 50 m [4]
magnetic flux density 1.008–2.801 µT (measured) Egypt beneath the tower at a height of 120 cm [5]
magnetic flux density 1.031–2.684 µT (measured) Egypt beneath the tower at a height of 80 cm [5]
magnetic flux density 1.031–2.917 µT (measured) Egypt beneath the tower at a height of 180 cm [5]
magnetic flux density 1.137 µT (mean, measured) Germany under the lines at a height of 1 m [2]
magnetic flux density 1.385 µT (maximum, measured) Germany at a distance of 20 m and a height of 1 m above ground [2]
magnetic flux density 1.92 µT (maximum, measured) USA at a distance of 20 m and a curret load of 600 A [1]
magnetic flux density 2–5.3 µT (measured) Germany at a height of 1 m beneath the power lines [2]
magnetic flux density 2.5 µT (maximum, measured) Serbia at a distance of 8.3 m and a current load of 230 A [6]
magnetic flux density 2.595 µT (maximum, measured) Germany beneath the power lines at a height of 1 m [2]
magnetic flux density 3 µT (measured) Germany at a distance of 25 m and a current load of 650 A [4]
magnetic flux density 3 µT (maximum, measured) Serbia in the slepping room of a bungalow near the power lines [6]
magnetic flux density 3.56 µT (maximum, measured) USA at a distance of 10 m and a current load of 600 A [1]
magnetic flux density 4.2 µT (measured) Germany at a height of 1 m and 30% current load [2]
magnetic flux density 5–20 µT (maximum, measured) Germany directly beneath the power lines [7]
magnetic flux density 6 µT (maximum, measured) Sweden on weekends at a height of 1 m beneath the power lines [3]
magnetic flux density 7.5 µT (measured) Germany at a distance of 10 m and a current load of 650 A [4]
magnetic flux density 8 µT (measured) Germany in the center of the power lines [4]
magnetic flux density 8 µT (maximum, measured) Sweden on weekdays at a height of 1 m beneath the power lines [3]
magnetic flux density 8.5 µT (measured) Japan 60 Hz power lines [8]
magnetic flux density 8.5 µT (measured) Germany at a distance of 5 m and a current load of 650 A [4]
magnetic flux density 15.5 µT (maximum, measured) Germany at a height of 1 m above ground and maximum current load [2]
Measurand Value Feature Remarks
electric field strength 0.066 kV/m (mean, measured) - at a distance of 100 m and a height of 1 m [2]
230 kV
Measurand Value Feature Remarks
electric field strength 400 V/m (measured) Iran at a distance of 50 m and a current load of 650 A [9]
electric field strength 800 V/m (measured) Iran at a distance of 30 m and a current load of 650 A [9]
electric field strength 1,500 V/m (measured) Iran at a distance of 20 m and a current load of 650 A [9]
electric field strength 4,000 V/m (measured) Iran at a distance of 10 m and a current load of 650 A [9]
electric field strength 8,000 V/m (measured) Iran beneath the power lines with a current load of 650 A [9]
magnetic flux density 0.08 µT (maximum, measured) USA at a distance of 91.44 m for average usage [10]
magnetic flux density 0.16 µT (measured) USA at a distance of 91.44 m for maximum usage [10]
magnetic flux density 0.18 µT (maximum, measured) USA at a distance of 60.96 m for average usage [10]
magnetic flux density 0.36 µT (measured) USA at a distance of 60.96 m for maximuzm usage [10]
magnetic flux density 0.7 µT (maximum, measured) USA at a distance of 30.48 m for average usage [10]
magnetic flux density 1.5 µT (measured) USA at a distance of 30.48 m for maximum usage [10]
magnetic flux density 2 µT (measured) Iran at a distance of 20 m and a current load of 650 A [9]
magnetic flux density 2 µT (maximum, measured) USA at a distance of 15.24 m for average usage [10]
magnetic flux density 3 µT (measured) Iran at a distance of 10 m and a current load of 650 A [9]
magnetic flux density 3 µT (measured) Iran at a distance of 50 m and a current load of 650 A [9]
magnetic flux density 4 µT (measured) USA at a distance of 15.24 m for peak usage [10]
magnetic flux density 6 µT (measured) Iran beneath the power lines at a current load of 650 A [9]
magnetic flux density 10 µT (measured) Iran at a distance of 30 m and a current load of 650 A [9]
275 kV
Measurand Value Feature Remarks
electric field strength 0.2 kV/m (measured) Great Britain at a distance of 25 m to the ceter [11]
electric field strength 1 kV/m (maximum, measured) USA at a distance of 20 m to the power lines [12]
electric field strength 3.4 kV/m (maximum, measured) Great Britain at a height of 1 m during dry weather [13]
magnetic flux density 3.6 µT Japan 60 Hz power lines [8]
300 kV
Measurand Value Feature Remarks
magnetic flux density 0.1 µT (maximum, measured) Norway at a distance of <150 m to the lines [14]
magnetic flux density 0.27 µT (mean, measured) Norway arithmetic mean value of the magnetic field that 31 school children were exposed to during a complete day (24 h); distance between the lines and the school: 24 m, distance between the lines and the dwelling: 201 - 325 m [15]
magnetic flux density 0.4–1.6 µT (maximum, measured) Norway at a distance <50 m to the lines [14]
magnetic flux density 0.48 µT (mean, measured) Norway arithmetic mean value of the magnetic field that 31 school children were exposed to during a complete day (24 h); distance between the lines and the school: 24 m; distance between the lines and the dwelling: 101 - 200 m [15]
magnetic flux density 0.5 µT (mean, measured) Norway arithmetic mean value of the magnetic field that 31 school children were exposed to during a complete day (24 h); distance between the lines and the school: 24 m, distance between the lines and the dwelling: 51 - 100 m [15]
magnetic flux density 0.75 µT (mean, measured) Norway arithmetic mean value of the magnetic field that 31 school children were exposed to during a complete day (24 h); distance between the lines and the school: 24 m; distance between the lines and the dwelling: < 50 m [15]

References

  1. King RW (1998): Fields and currents in the organs of the human body when exposed to power lines and VLF transmitters.
  2. Neitzke HP et al. (2010): [Determination and comparison of electric and magnetic field exposures emitted by underground and overhead power lines - project 3608S03011 ].
  3. Svedenstal BM et al. (1999): DNA damage, cell kinetics and ODC activities studied in CBA mice exposed to electromagnetic fields generated by transmission lines.
  4. Börner F (2003): [BIA-Report 6/03: Electromagnetic Fields near Electrical and Electronic Appliances, Machines and Equipment].
  5. Hamza A (2005): Evaluation and measurement of magnetic field exposure over human body near EHV transmission lines.
  6. Vulevic B et al. (2011): Survey of ELF magnetic field levels in households near overhead power lines in Serbia.
  7. No authors listed (2018): [Radiation and radiation protection]
  8. Miyaji Y et al. (2014): Evaluation of magnetic field generated by power facilities in accordance with IEC 62110.
  9. Ahmadi H et al. (2010): Electromagnetic fields near transmission lines - problems and solutions.
  10. EPA (1992): EMF in your Environment- Magnetic Field Measurements of Everyday Electrical Devices.
  11. Allen SG et al. (1994): Review of Occupational Exposure to Optical Radiation and Electric and Magnetic Fields with Regard to the Proposed CEC Physical Agents Directive. NRPB·R265
  12. Swanson J et al. (2000): Comment on the papers: Increased exposure to pollutant aerosols under high voltage power lines; and Corona ions from powerlines and increased exposure to pollutant aerosols.
  13. Fews AP et al. (1999): Increased exposure to pollutant aerosols under high voltage power lines.
  14. Tynes T et al. (1997): Electromagnetic Fields and Cancer in Children Residing Near Norwegian High-Voltage Power Lines.
  15. Vistnes AI et al. (1997): Exposure of children to residential magnetic fields in Norway: is proximity to power lines an adequate predictor of exposure?.