Study type: Medical/biological study (experimental study)

Effect of whole-body exposure to high-frequency electromagnetic field on the brain electrogeny in neurodefective and healthy mice. med./bio.

Published in: Prague Med Rep 2005; 106 (1): 91-100

Aim of study (acc. to author)

An electrophysiological investigation of the influence of radiofrequency electromagnetic fields on brain functions in Lurcher mutant mice, which represent a model of neurodegenerative disease, and on healthy control mice.

Endpoint

Exposure

Exposure Parameters
Exposure 1: 880–890 MHz
Exposure duration: see add. information
  • power: 10 W unspecified

General information

All experiments were performed under urethane anaesthesia.

Exposure 1

Main characteristics
Frequency 880–890 MHz
Type
Charakteristic
  • guided field
Exposure duration see add. information
Exposure setup
Exposure source
Chamber Faraday chamber
Setup The EMF was directed by a waveguide with an orifice area of 600 cm² to the space where the animals were placed (modified stereotaxic frame).
Sham exposure A sham exposure was conducted.
Additional info Spontaneous electrocorticogram was measured as 2 min segments from continuously recorded activity either with or without RF EMF exposure. Recording time for each animal was approx. 40 min. The actual duration of exposure is not clear.
Parameters
Measurand Value Type Method Mass Remarks
power 10 W unspecified unspecified - -

Exposed system:

Methods Endpoint/measurement parameters/methodology

Investigated system:
Investigated organ system:
Time of investigation:
  • during exposure

Main outcome of study (acc. to author)

Spontaneous electrocorticogram evaluation showed a distinct shift to lower frequency components but clear effect has been found only in wild type mice whereas in Lurcher mutant mice only gentle differences between frequency spectra were revealed. Measurement of hippocampal rhythmicity showed gentle changes with increase of higher frequencies (i.e. opposite effect than in cortex) and changes in theta oscillations registered from a dentate gyrus and CA1 area in both types of animals (wild type and mutant).
These data support the idea about possible influencing the central nervous system by radiofrequency electromagnetic field exposure.

Study character:

Study funded by

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