Study type: Epidemiological study (observational study)

Changes in excretion rates of stress hormones in medical staff exposed to electromagnetic radiation. epidem.

Published in: Environmentalist 2007; 27 (4): 551-555

Aim of study (acc. to author)

A case-control study was conducted in Bulgaria to investigate the effect of electromagnetic fields on the excretion rates of stress hormones of medical staff in physiotherapy.

Further details

The physiotherapists and the control group of nurses had similar average length of service (about 19 to 34 years) and similar working shifts (morning and afternoon shifts). The excretion rates of the stress hormones were examined during the morning shift (7:30-14:00) at three periods: early morning (6:30-8:30), second period (8:30-1:00) and third period (11:00-13:30). The levels of cortisol, adrenaline and noradrenaline were assessed by radio immunological kit and spectrofluorometry in urine samples.

Endpoint/type of risk estimation

Exposure

Assessment

Exposure groups

Group Description
Reference group 1 nurses
Group 2 physiotherapists working with electromagnetic fields emitting devices

Population

Case group

Control group

Study size

Cases Controls
Participants 15 15
Statistical analysis method:

Conclusion (acc. to author)

Calculations of the individual EMF exposure show levels above the ICNIRP guidelines. Significantly higher excretion rates of stress hormones cortisol, adrenaline and noradrenaline among the studied physiotherapists in comparison with the control group of nurses were found.
The authors concluded that electromagnetic fields influenced the excretion rates of stress hormones of medical staff in physiotherapy.

Study funded by

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