Study type: Epidemiological study (observational study)

Extremely low-frequency magnetic field exposure, electrical shocks and risk of Parkinson's disease. epidem.

Published in: Int Arch Occup Environ Health 2015; 88 (2): 227-234

Aim of study (acc. to author)

A case-control study was conducted in the Netherlands to investigate the possible association between the risk of Parkinson disease and exposure to extremely low-frequency magnetic field and to electrical shocks from both occupational and non-occupational sources.

Endpoint/type of risk estimation

Type of risk estimation: (odds ratio (OR))

Exposure

Assessment

Exposure groups

Group Description
Reference group 1 job exposure matrix: only low
Group 2 job exposure matrix, ever exposure: medium
Group 3 job exposure matrix, ever exposure: high
Group 4 exposure duration: 1 - 8 years
Group 5 exposure duration: 9 - 23 years
Group 6 exposure duration: 24 - 55 years
Group 7 cumulative exposure: 1 - 9 unit-years
Group 8 cumulative exposure: 10 - 26 unit-years
Group 9 cumulative exposure: 27 - 188 unit-years
Reference group 10 household appliances exposure + non -occupational welding: 0 µT-years
Group 11 household appliances exposure + non -occupational welding: > 0 - 2.0 µT-years
Group 12 household appliances exposure + non -occupational welding: > 2.0 - 3.8 µT-years
Group 13 household appliances exposure + non -occupational welding: > 3.8 - 5.7 µT-years
Group 14 household appliances exposure + non -occupational welding: > 5.7 µT-years

Population

Case group

Control group

Study size

Cases Controls
Eligible 1,001 -
Contacted 993 -
Participants 448 876
Participation rate 45 % 35 %
Statistical analysis method: (adjustment: )

Conclusion (acc. to author)

No association between the risk of Parkinson disease and exposure to extremely low-frequency magnetic field and to electrical shocks from both occupational and non-occupational sources was found. However, a quite consistently reduced risk estimates across the majority of the exposure categories explored was observed. Given the results of the previous studies and the absence of any postulated mechanism, this is unlikely to represent a true protective effect of extremely low-frequency magnetic fields or electrical shocks on the occurrence of Parkinson disease.
The authors conclude that the results of the present study suggest that no association exists between Parkinson disease and exposure to extremely low-frequency magnetic fields, electrical shocks or having worked in 'electrical occupations'.

Study funded by

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