Study type: Epidemiological study (observational study)

Residential Distance to High-voltage Power Lines and Risk of Neurodegenerative Diseases: a Danish Population-based Case-Control Study. epidem.

Published in: Am J Epidemiol 2013; 177 (9): 970-978

Aim of study (acc. to author)

A case-control study was conducted in Denmark to investigate the possible association between residential distance to high-voltage power lines and neurodegenerative diseases, especially Alzheimer disease.

Endpoint/type of risk estimation

Type of risk estimation: (hazard ratio)

Exposure

Assessment

Exposure groups

Group Description
Reference group 1 residential distance of 132 to 400 kV power lines: ≥ 600 m
Group 2 residential distance of 132 to 400 kV power lines: 200 - < 600 m
Group 3 residential distance of 132 to 400 kV power lines: 50 - < 200 m
Group 4 residential distance of 132 to 400 kV power lines: 0 - < 50 m

Population

Case group

Control group

Statistical analysis method: (adjustment: )

Conclusion (acc. to author)

The risks for developing dementia, Parkinson disease, multiple sclerosis, and motor neuron disease were not increased in persons living within close vicinity of a power line in the time period 5-20 years before diagnosis. The risk of Alzheimer disease was not increased forever living within 50 m of a power line (hazard ratio 1.04, CI 0.69-1.56). No dose-response relationship according to number of years of living within 50 m of a power line was observed, but there were weak indications of an increased risk for persons diagnosed by the age of 75 years.
The authors concluded that there was little support for an association between neurodegenerative disease and living close to power lines.

Study funded by

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