Study type: Medical/biological study (experimental study)

Effect of static magnetic fields on the budding of yeast cells. med./bio.

Published in: Bioelectromagnetics 2010; 31 (8): 622-629

Aim of study (acc. to author)

To evaluate the effect of static magnetic fields on the budding of single yeast cells.

Background/further details

Yeast cells were exposed in the center of a static magnetic field or in the inner or outer region of an inhomogeneous magnetic field.
Budding in yeast cells is a form of asexual reproduction. This process results in a mother and a smaller daughter cell.

Endpoint

Exposure

Exposure Parameters
Exposure 1:
Exposure duration: continuous for 4 hours
homogenous static magentic field
Exposure 2:
Exposure duration: continuous for 4 hours
inhomogenous static magentic field
  • magnetic gradient (B x (dB/dx)) of 6100 T²/m (maximum) at the edge of the pole pieces
  • magnetic gradient of 1600 T²/m (minimum) at the edge of the pole pieces
Exposure 3:
Exposure duration: continuous for 4 hours
inhomogenous static magentic field
  • magnetic gradient (B x (dB/dx)) of 6100 T²/m (maximum) at the edge of the pole pieces
  • magnetic gradient of 1600 T²/m (minimum) at the edge of the pole pieces

General information

The growth of yeast cells was monitored at three regions (the center, outside, and edge of the pole pieces), each with a width of 500 µm.

Exposure 1

Main characteristics
Frequency
Type
Exposure duration continuous for 4 hours
Additional info homogenous static magentic field
Exposure setup
Exposure source
Chamber yeast cells were exposed in a square fused-silica capillary in an agar solution that had a 100 x 100 mm² inner section, 300 x 300 mm² outer section, and was 7.5 cm in length; after setting, the capillaries were immediately subjected to the magnetic field experiments, which were conducted under dark conditions at 28.4±0.9 °C
Setup magnetic circuit (3 x 4 x 5 cm³) was constructed using two NdFeB magnets, two yokes, two pole pieces, four spacers and two frames; in the center of the magnetic circuit, a pair of iron pole pieces was set with a 400 or 600 µm-gap in a 4 x 4 mm² area; yeast was exposed in the center of the pole pieces
Sham exposure A sham exposure was conducted.
Parameters
Measurand Value Type Method Mass Remarks
magnetic flux density 2.93 T maximum calculated - at the center of the pole pieces

Exposure 2

Main characteristics
Frequency
Type
Exposure duration continuous for 4 hours
Additional info inhomogenous static magentic field
Exposure setup
Exposure source
Setup yeast was exposed in the edge of the pole pieces
Sham exposure A sham exposure was conducted.
Parameters
Measurand Value Type Method Mass Remarks
cf. remarks - - - - magnetic gradient (B x (dB/dx)) of 6100 T²/m (maximum) at the edge of the pole pieces
cf. remarks - - - - magnetic gradient of 1600 T²/m (minimum) at the edge of the pole pieces

Exposure 3

Main characteristics
Frequency
Type
Exposure duration continuous for 4 hours
Additional info inhomogenous static magentic field
Exposure setup
Exposure source
Setup yeast was exposed outside of the pole pieces
Sham exposure A sham exposure was conducted.
Parameters
Measurand Value Type Method Mass Remarks
cf. remarks - - - - magnetic gradient (B x (dB/dx)) of 6100 T²/m (maximum) at the edge of the pole pieces
cf. remarks - - - - magnetic gradient of 1600 T²/m (minimum) at the edge of the pole pieces

Exposed system:

Methods Endpoint/measurement parameters/methodology

Investigated system:
Time of investigation:
  • after exposure

Main outcome of study (acc. to author)

After exposure to one of the different magnetic field conditions, the growth of budding yeast cells was slightly inhibited compared to unexposed cells. However, the magnetic field exposure clearly influenced the budding angle. After exposure to a homogeneous magnetic field the budding direction of daughter cells was mainly oriented in the direction of the magnetic field. In the inhomogeneous magnetic field, the daughter cells tended to bud along the axis where the magnetic gradient was high. No differences in the budding angle were seen between the inner and outer region of the inhomogeneous field.
The authors conclude that the direction of the magnetic field was the main factor controlling the budding direction of yeast cells.

Study character:

Study funded by

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