Study type: Epidemiological study

Residential exposure to electromagnetic fields during pregnancy and risk of child cancer: A longitudinal cohort study. epidem.

Published in: Environ Res 2019; 176: 108524

Aim of study (acc. to author)

A cohort study was conducted in Canada to investigated the association between maternal residential proximity during pregnancy to high voltage power transformer stations and power lines and the risk of child cancer.

Endpoint/type of risk estimation

Type of risk estimation: (hazard ratio)

Exposure

Assessment

Exposure groups

Group Description
Reference group 1 distance between residence and transformer station: ≥ 200 m
Group 2 distance between residence and transformer station: < 200 m
Reference group 3 distance between residence and power line: ≥ 100 m
Group 4 distance between residence and power line: < 100 m

Population

Study size

Type Value
Total 784,944
Other:

1114 children with cancer; 4,647,472 person-years of follow-up

Statistical analysis method: ( adjustment: )

Conclusion (acc. to author)

Maternal residential proximity during pregnancy to high-voltage transformer stations was associated with a statistically non-significant increased risk of cancer in their offsprings, but there was no association with power transmission lines. Compared with 200 m, a distance of 80 m from a transformer station was associated with a hazard ratio of 1.08 (CI 0.98-1.20) for any cancer, 1.04 (CI 0.88-1.23) for hematopoietic cancer, and 1.11 (CI 0.99-1.25) for solid tumors.
The authors conclude that maternal residential proximity during pregnancy to high-voltage transformer stations is associated with a borderline risk of childhood cancer, but the absence of an association with power transmission lines suggests no causal link.

Study funded by

Related articles