Study type: Epidemiological study (observational study)

ELF-EMF correlation study on distance from overhead transmission lines and acute leukemia among children in Klang Valley, Malaysia. epidem.

Published in: IEEE Conference on Biomedical Engineering and Sciences (IECBES), 2014. IEEE, 2014, ISBN 9781479940844: 710-714

Aim of study (acc. to author)

The association between residential proximity to a power line and the risk for acute childhood leukemia was investigated in Malaysia.

Further details

Measurements of the magnetic flux densities were conducted as an additionally exposure estimate in comparison to the previous study.

Endpoint/type of risk estimation

Type of risk estimation: (odds ratio (OR))

Exposure

Assessment

Exposure groups

Group Description
Reference group 1 magnetic flux density: < 0.3 µT
Group 2 magnetic flux density: > 0.3 µT
Reference group 3 distance between residence and power line: > 200 m
Group 4 distance between residence and power line: < 200 m

Population

Case group

Control group

Study size

Cases Controls
Eligible 128 128
Evaluable 108 118
Statistical analysis method:

Conclusion (acc. to author)

Overall, there were 32 out of 226 children (14.2 %) living in areas where power lines exist. 11 children with acute leukemia and 10 children of the control group have been exposed to magnetic flux densities higher than 0.3 µT. 9 children with acute leukemia and 11 control subjects have been living in a distance less than 200 m to a power line.
No associations between childhood leukemia and residential proximity to power lines or magnetic flux densities were observed.
The authors conclude that the previous findings of an association between the residential proximity to power lines and the occurrence of childhood leukemia might be due to other environmental or sociodemographic risk factors (e.g., family income, number of siblings, age of parents, paternal smoking).

Study funded by

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