Study type: Medical/biological study (experimental study)

Clastogenic effects of radiofrequency radiations on chromosomes of Tradescantia. med./bio.

Published in: Mutation Research - Letters 1994; 328 (1-2): 65-68

Aim of study (acc. to author)

To determine the clastogenic effect of radiofrequency radiation in an in situ experiment with the Tradescantia micronucleus test (Trad-MCN-test).

Background/further details

The assay was used as a monitor to find out whether short-wave electromagnetic fields in the vicinity of broadcasting antennae could cause chromosome damage.

Endpoint

Exposure

Exposure Parameters
Exposure 1: 10–20 MHz
Modulation type: AM
Exposure duration: 30 hrs

Exposure 1

Main characteristics
Frequency 10–20 MHz
Type
Exposure duration 30 hrs
Modulation
Modulation type AM
Exposure setup
Exposure source
Chamber Wooden chambers, Faraday cages and cages made from plastic mesh material.
Additional info distance of 10, 15, 30, 200 m of the exposed object from antenna.
Parameters
Measurand Value Type Method Mass Remarks
electric field strength 40 V/m unspecified measured - in wooden chamber 30 m from slewable curtain antenna
electric field strength 70 V/m unspecified measured - in wooden chamber 30 m from the vertical cage antenna at 14 MHz
electric field strength 40 V/m unspecified measured - in mesh cage 30 m from the slewable curtain antenna at 10 MHz
electric field strength 90 V/m unspecified measured - in wooden chamber 15 m from the vertical cage antenna at 14 MHz
magnetic field strength 110 mA/m unspecified measured - in mesh cage 10 m from the slewable curtain antenna at 18-21 MHz
electric field strength 1 V/m unspecified measured - to 3 V/m; in wooden chamber 200 m from the broadcasting area
electric field strength 65 V/m unspecified measured - to 170 V/m; in a mesh cage at 10 m from the slewable curtain antenna at 18-21 MHz

Exposed system:

Methods Endpoint/measurement parameters/methodology

Investigated system:
Time of investigation:
  • after exposure

Main outcome of study (acc. to author)

At all exposure sites in the immediate vicinity of the antennae a statistically significant increase of micronucleus formation was found. Since the parallel exposure in a non-shielding and a shielding cage also revealed significant differences in micronucleus frequencies, the clastogenic effects are attributable to the short-wave radiation from the antennae.

Study character:

Study funded by

Related articles