Study type: Medical/biological study (experimental study)

Evaluating the combinative effects on human lymphocyte DNA damage induced by ultraviolet ray C plus 1.8 GHz microwaves using comet assay in vitro. med./bio.

Published in: Toxicology 2007; 232 (3): 311-316

Aim of study (acc. to author)

To study whether 1.8 GHz microwave exposure can influence human lymphocyte DNA damage induced by ultraviolet C rays (UV-C).

Background/further details

The lymphocytes which were from three young healthy donors were divided into four groups: 1) sham exposure, 2) microwave exposure (SAR value of 3 W/kg; 0, 1.5 and 4 h), 3) UV-C exposure (254 nm UV-C rays at the doses of 0.25, 0.5, 0.75, 1.0, 1.5 and 2.0 J/m²), and 4) microwave exposure plus UV-C exposure (microwave exposure immediately after UV-C exposure).

Endpoint

Exposure

Exposure Parameters
Exposure 1: 1.8 GHz
Exposure duration: continuous for 1.5 h or 4 h

Exposure 1

Main characteristics
Frequency 1.8 GHz
Type
Charakteristic
  • guided field
Exposure duration continuous for 1.5 h or 4 h
Modulation
Modulation type unspecified
Exposure setup
Exposure source
Chamber The exposure system was the same as used in [Baohong et al., 2005]. Two rectangular waveguides were placed inside a conventional incubator at 37 °C and 5% CO2 and were blindly selected for RF or sham exposure by a computer controlled signal unit.
Setup The lymphocytes were exposed in 35-mm dishes placed in a TEM cell.
Sham exposure A sham exposure was conducted.
Parameters
Measurand Value Type Method Mass Remarks
SAR 3 W/kg - measured - -

Reference articles

  • Baohong W et al. (2005): Studying the synergistic damage effects induced by 1.8 GHz radiofrequency field radiation (RFR) with four chemical mutagens on human lymphocyte DNA using comet assay in vitro.

Exposed system:

Methods Endpoint/measurement parameters/methodology

Investigated system:
Time of investigation:
  • after exposure

Main outcome of study (acc. to author)

The data indicated that the difference of DNA damage induced between microwave exposure group and sham exposure group was not significant. The mean tail lengths (as index of DNA damage) induced by UV-C were significantly higher than those of control.
Mean tail lengths of some sub-groups in combinative exposure groups at 1.5 h incubation were significantly lower that those of corresponding UV-C sub-groups. However, mean tail lengths of some sub-groups in combinative exposure groups at 4 h incubation were significantly higher that those of corresponding UV-C sub-groups.
In conclusion, the data showed that 1.8 GHz (at SAR value of 3 W/kg) microwave exposure for 1.5 and 4 h did not enhance significantly human lymphocyte DNA damage, but could reduce and increase DNA damage induced by UV-C after an incubation time of 1.5 h and 4 h, respectively.

Study character:

Study funded by

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