Study type: Medical/biological study (experimental study)

Effect of 2.45 mT sinusoidal 50 Hz magnetic field on Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains deficient in DNA strand breaks repair. med./bio.

Published in: Int J Radiat Biol 2010; 86 (7): 602-611

Aim of study (acc. to author)

To study whether extremely low frequency magnetic field exposure produce alterations in the growth, cell cycle, survival and DNA damage of wild type and mutant yeast strains.

Background/further details

Double strand breaks are repaired in Saccharomyces cerevisiae in different DNA repair pathways: 1) Homologous recombination, 2) single-strand annealing, and 3) nonhomologous end joining. Rad52 mutant yeast cells cannot repair double-strand breaks via homologous recombination and show reduced ability for single-strand annealing. In HDF1 mutant cells the nonhomologous end joining pathway is affected. In rad52 hdf1 double mutants, all pathways of double-strand breaks DNA repair are blocked.

Endpoint

Exposure

Exposure Parameters
Exposure 1: 50 Hz
Exposure duration: continuous for 96 h

Exposure 1

Main characteristics
Frequency 50 Hz
Type
Waveform
Exposure duration continuous for 96 h
Exposure setup
Exposure source
Setup samples located in the region within the coils where the fields' homogeneity was high; coils 40 cm in diameter, 154 turns of 1.4 mm copper wire, centres separated 20 cm.
Parameters
Measurand Value Type Method Mass Remarks
magnetic flux density 2.45 mT - measured - -

Exposed system:

Methods Endpoint/measurement parameters/methodology

Investigated system:
Time of investigation:
  • after exposure

Main outcome of study (acc. to author)

The authors conclude that the extremely low frequency magnetic field exposure (2.45 mT sinusoidal 50 Hz, 96 h) induced alterations in the growth (increase in rad52 mutant) and survival (a statistically not sigificant decrease) of Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains deficient in DNA strand breaks repair. However, the magnetic field exposure did not induce alterations in the cell cycle and did not cause DNA damage.

Study character:

Study funded by

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