Study type: Medical/biological study (experimental study)

Effects of Prenatal and Postnatal Exposure to GSM-Like Radiofrequency on Blood Chemistry and Oxidative Stress in Infant Rabbits, an Experimental Study. med./bio.

Published in: Cell Biochem Biophys 2013; 67 (2): 743-751

Aim of study (acc. to author)

To investigate the potential hazardous effects of prenatal and/or postnatal exposure to a GSM-like radiofrequency field on the blood chemistry and lipid peroxidation levels of infant rabbits.

Background/further details

Pregnant rabbits were sham exposed (n=9) or exposed (n=9). After birth, 72 newborn were divided into four groups: 1.) sham exposure (control group), 2.) prenatal exposure, 3.) postnatal exposure and 4.) prenatal and postnatal exposure. Postnatal exposure started at an age of 1 month. During postnatal exposure, female infants were exposed for 7 days, whereas male infants were exposed for 14 days. The day after the last exposure, rabbits were killed and examined.

Endpoint

Exposure

Exposure Parameters
Exposure 1: 1,800 MHz
Modulation type: pulsed
Exposure duration: 15 min/day for 7 days in pregnant animals (between 15th and 22nd day of gestation), for 7 days in female infants and for 14 days in male infants

Exposure 1

Main characteristics
Frequency 1,800 MHz
Type
Exposure duration 15 min/day for 7 days in pregnant animals (between 15th and 22nd day of gestation), for 7 days in female infants and for 14 days in male infants
Modulation
Modulation type pulsed
Pulse width 576 ms
Duty cycle 12.5 %
Repetition frequency 217 Hz
Pulse type rectangular
Exposure setup
Setup An RFR generator provided 20 dBm (0.1 W) power during the exposure period.
Sham exposure A sham exposure was conducted.
Parameters
Measurand Value Type Method Mass Remarks
power 0.1 W maximum - - applied output power

Reference articles

  • Guler G et al. (2012): The effect of radiofrequency radiation on DNA and lipid damage in female and male infant rabbits.

Exposed system:

Methods Endpoint/measurement parameters/methodology

Investigated system:
Time of investigation:
  • after exposure

Main outcome of study (acc. to author)

For infant female rabbits: There was no difference in the levels of cholesterol, uric acid, creatin kinase, creatine kinase-myocardial band isoenzyme and albumin. The level of gamma-glutamyl transpeptidase was significantly decreased in the groups with postnatal exposure compared to the control group. In the prenatal exposed group, the level of aspartate aminotransferase was significantly increased when compared to the control group. The level of alanine transaminase was significantly increased in the group with prenatal exposure and in the group with postnatal exposure in comparison to the control. In all exposure groups, the total protein content was significantly increased, while the level of glucose and the level of urea were significantly decreased compared to the control group. The amount of lipid peroxidation was significantly increased in the prenatal exposure group compared to the control group.
For infant male rabbits: There was no difference in the levels of cholesterol, urea, creatin kinase, creatine kinase-myocardial band isoenzyme, gamma-glutamyl transpeptidase, total protein and glucose. In all exposure groups, the levels of creatinine and albumin were significantly increased, while the level of gamma-glutamyl transpeptidase was significantly decreased compared to the control group. In both postnatal exposed groups, the level of uric acid was significantly increased when compared to the control. The level of alanine transaminase was significantly increased in the prenatal exposed group in comparison to he control group. The amount of lipid peroxidation was significantly increased in the prenatal exposure group compared to the control group.
(Remark EMF-Portal: Results taken from tables, sometimes variations in running text)
The authors conclude that exposure to a GSM-like radiofrequency field may lead to oxidative stress and changes on some blood chemistry parameters.

Study character:

Study funded by

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