Study type: Medical/biological study (experimental study)

Molecular responses of Jurkat T-cells to 1763 MHz radiofrequency radiation. med./bio.

Published in: Int J Radiat Biol 2008; 84 (9): 734-741

Aim of study (acc. to author)

To study cellular and molecular changes in Jurkat cells after irradiating with 1763 MHz radiofrequency irradiation.

Endpoint

Exposure

Exposure Parameters
Exposure 1: 1,762.5 MHz
Exposure duration: repeated daily exposure, 1 h/day, for 1, 2, or 3 days
Exposure 2: 1,762.5 MHz
Exposure duration: continuous for 1, 4, and 24 h

Exposure 1

Main characteristics
Frequency 1,762.5 MHz
Type
Charakteristic
  • guided field
Exposure duration repeated daily exposure, 1 h/day, for 1, 2, or 3 days
Modulation
Modulation type cf. additional info
Additional info

CDMA signal

Exposure setup
Exposure source
Chamber Jurkat cells were grown at 37°C in a 5% CO2 incubator. The temperature in the exposure chamber was maintained at 37 ± 0.2°C by circulating water within the cavity. The exposure system was first equilibrated to 37°C for 30 min without cells.
Setup Cells were exposed in 100-mm Petri dishes containing 18 ml of growth medium.
Sham exposure A sham exposure was conducted.
Additional info After the last exposure, cells were incubated for 24 h before harvesting. Gamma radiation is shown in Fig. 2 (D) only but not explained.
Parameters
Measurand Value Type Method Mass Remarks
SAR 2 W/kg - - - -
SAR 10 W/kg - - - -

Exposure 2

Main characteristics
Frequency 1,762.5 MHz
Type
Charakteristic
  • guided field
Exposure duration continuous for 1, 4, and 24 h
Modulation
Modulation type cf. additional info
Additional info

CDMA signal

Exposure setup
Exposure source
Sham exposure A sham exposure was conducted.
Additional info There are contradictory statements in the text and Table I whether indicated times are duration of, or hours after, exposure. H2O2 (4 h) is shown in Table I only but not explained.
Parameters
Measurand Value Type Method Mass Remarks
SAR 10 W/kg - - - -

Reference articles

  • Lee JS et al. (2006): Radiofrequency radiation does not induce stress response in human T-lymphocytes and rat primary astrocytes.

Exposed system:

Methods Endpoint/measurement parameters/methodology

Investigated material:
Time of investigation:
  • after exposure

Main outcome of study (acc. to author)

Radiofrequency exposure did not produce significant changes in cell numbers, cell cycle distributions, or levels of DNA damage. The treatment with radiofrequency irradiation for 24 hours did not produce statistically significant changes in global gene expression. However, radiofrequency exposure altered gene expression of ten individual genes: e.g. two cytokine receptor genes (chemokine receptor 3 (CXCR3) and interleukin 1 receptor, type II (IL1R2)) were down-regulated upon radiofrequency irradiation, but they were not directly related to cell proliferation or DNA damage responses.
The decrease in the gene expression of two cytokine receptor genes suggests that radiofrequency exposure can influence the chemotaxis of various immune cells.

Study character:

Study funded by

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