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Medical/biological study (experimental study)

Rat fertility and embryo fetal development: influence of exposure to the Wi-Fi signal.

Published in: Reprod Toxicol 2013; 36: 1-5

Aim of study (acc. to author)

To investigate the effects of an exposure to a Wi-Fi signal on the reproductive system of male and female rats.
Background/further details: The male rats were exposed during sexual maturation for 3 weeks before mating, the females for 2 weeks (n=36, respectively). After the mating, couples were exposed for 3 more weeks. One day before the expected delivery, the dams were sacrificed and the fetuses were removed from the uterus and examined. Also, the male rats were sacrificed and their sexual organs were examined.
Three groups were examined: 1.) sham exposure, 2.) exposure to a specific absorption rate of 0.08 W/kg and 3.) exposure to a specific absorption rate of 4 W/kg.

Endpoint

Exposure

Exposure Parameters
Exposure 1: 2.45 GHz
Modulation type: pulsed
Exposure duration: continuous for 1 h/day, 6 days/week for up to 36 days: 2 weeks (female) or 3 weeks (male) pre-mating + 3 weeks (all animals) post-mating
  • SAR: 0.08 W/kg
Exposure 2: 2.45 GHz
Modulation type: pulsed
Exposure duration: continuous for 1 h/day, 6 days/week for up to 36 days: 2 weeks (female) or 3 weeks (male) pre-mating + 3 weeks (all animals) post-mating
Exposure 1
Main characteristics
Frequency 2.45 GHz
Type
Exposure duration continuous for 1 h/day, 6 days/week for up to 36 days: 2 weeks (female) or 3 weeks (male) pre-mating + 3 weeks (all animals) post-mating
Modulation
Modulation type pulsed
Duty cycle 50 %
Exposure setup
Exposure source
  • two PCs equipped with Wi-Fi cards
Setup 150 cm x 150 cm x 150 cm cubic reverberation chamber, fitted with three mode stirrers and six antennas, activated at random, and placed in the center of each side of the cube; polypropylene animal cages with one animal or one couple of animals placed in the 40 cm x 40 cm x 40 cm exposure volume in the cube's center
Sham exposure A sham exposure was conducted.
Parameters
Measurand Value Type Method Mass Remarks
SAR 0.08 W/kg - measured and calculated whole body -
Exposure 2
Main characteristics
Frequency 2.45 GHz
Type
Exposure duration continuous for 1 h/day, 6 days/week for up to 36 days: 2 weeks (female) or 3 weeks (male) pre-mating + 3 weeks (all animals) post-mating
Modulation
Modulation type pulsed
Duty cycle 50 %
Exposure setup
Exposure source
Sham exposure A sham exposure was conducted.
Parameters
Measurand Value Type Method Mass Remarks
SAR 4 W/kg - measured and calculated whole body -
Reference articles
  • Wu T et al. (2010): Whole-body new-born and young rats' exposure assessment in a reverberating chamber operating at 2.4 GHz.
Exposed system:

Methods Endpoint/measurement parameters/methodology

Investigated organ system:
Time of investigation:
  • before exposure
  • during exposure
  • after exposure

Main outcome of study (acc. to author)

No influence of the exposure on the body weight and the male and female reproductive organs was found as well as no malformation in the fetuses.
The results provide evidence of an absence of effects of Wi-Fi exposure on male and female rat fertility.
Study character:

Study funded by

  • National Research Agency (L'Agence nationale de la recherche, ANR), France

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