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Medical/biological study (experimental study)

Effects of exposure to electromagnetic field (1.8/0.9 GHz) on testicular function and structure in growing rats.

Published in: Res Vet Sci 2012; 93 (2): 1001-1005

Aim of study (acc. to author)

To study the possible effects of 900 MHz and 1800 MHz electromagnetic field exposures on testicular function in growing male rats (two days old).
Background/further details: 33 rats were divided into three groups (two exposure groups and a sham exposure group; each group n=11).

Endpoint

Exposure

    • 900–1,800 MHz
    • mobile communications
    • GSM
Exposure Parameters
Exposure 1: 900 MHz
Exposure duration: continuous for 2 h/day for 90 days
  • SAR: 3 mW/kg maximum (whole body) (aged 10 days)
  • SAR: 1.2 mW/kg minimum (whole body) (aged 70 days)
Exposure 2: 1,800 MHz
Exposure duration: continuous for 2 h/day for 90 days
  • SAR: 0.053 mW/kg maximum (whole body) (aged 10 days)
  • SAR: 0.011 mW/kg minimum (whole body) (aged 70 days)
General information
Rats were divided into three groups with 11 animals each.
Exposure 1
Main characteristics
Frequency 900 MHz
Type
Exposure duration continuous for 2 h/day for 90 days
Exposure setup
Exposure source
  • monopole
Distance between exposed object and exposure source 2 cm
Setup rats were kept seperately in their experiment boxes; monopole antennas were placed at a distance of 2 cm next to rat's head
Sham exposure A sham exposure was conducted.
Parameters
Measurand Value Type Method Mass Remarks
SAR 3 mW/kg maximum measured and calculated whole body aged 10 days
SAR 1.2 mW/kg minimum measured and calculated whole body aged 70 days
Additional parameter details
experiments were performed in a RF shielded room
Measurement and calculation details
SAR values were not directly measured, but derived from measurements of the electric field and power density
Exposure 2
Main characteristics
Frequency 1,800 MHz
Type
Exposure duration continuous for 2 h/day for 90 days
Exposure setup
Exposure source
Parameters
Measurand Value Type Method Mass Remarks
SAR 0.053 mW/kg maximum measured and calculated whole body aged 10 days
SAR 0.011 mW/kg minimum measured and calculated whole body aged 70 days
Additional parameter details
experiments were performed in a RF shielded room
Measurement and calculation details
SAR values were derived from measurements of the electric field and power density
Reference articles
Exposed system:

Methods Endpoint/measurement parameters/methodology

Investigated material:
Investigated organ system:
Time of investigation:
  • after exposure

Main outcome of study (acc. to author)

The mean plasma testosterone level and the percentage of epididymal sperm motility were significantly higher in the two exposure groups than in the sham exposed rats. The morphologically normal spermatozoa rates were statistically significant higher and the tail abnormality and total abnormalities percentage were statistically significant lower in the 900 MHz group compared with the 1800 MHz exposure and the sham exposed group. There was no statistically significant difference in the sperm concentration, head, and mid-piece abnormalities among the groups. Histopathologic parameters in the 1800 MHz group were significantly higher compared with the 900 MHz exposure and sham exposed group.
In conclusion, the data indicate that exposure to electromagnetic fields caused an increase in testosterone level, epididymal sperm motility, and normal sperm morphology of rats.
Study character:

Study funded by

  • University of Ondokuz Mayis, Samsun, Turkey

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